• Curriculum in Law and Technology

    Education at the intersection of law and technology in the heart of Silicon Valley

    Teaching law for practice.

    UC Hastings is committed to the changing nature of law.

    The law and technology curriculum at UC Hastings prepares students to be the kinds of future facing lawyers that will shape the future of law in both the private and public sectors.

  • Concentration in Technology and Innovation

    in the Practice of Law

    The Technology and Innovation in the Practice of Law concentration prepares students to challenge the status quo as technology and globalization accelerate change in the delivery of legal services.

     

    Learn more about the concentration and its requirements on the UC Hastings website. You can also download a pdf of the concentration requirements. If you have questions, please reach out to Concentration Advisor Professor Alice Armitage.

  • Course Offerings

    Courses in law, technology, and innovation are available to UC Hastings students in their 2L and 3L years

    Professors Alice Armitage and Drew Amerson | Fall Semester

    Legal operations (or "legal ops") provides the strategic planning, financial management, project management, and technology expertise to support and strengthen the delivery of legal services. In this course, students will learn about the economic forces currently impacting legal departments and law firms. Leading experts in the field of legal operations will be making presentations on a specific topic in many of the classes. These guest instructors will bring their own examples of real-world problems they faced and ask the students to solve them.

    Professor Alice Armitage | Spring Semester

    This course focuses on teaching students the entrepreneurial mindset and business principles that underlie the formation of a startup. Students will learn by doing: design thinking, lean startup, team building, agile development as well as business model canvas and value proposition creation methods will first be studied and then used by students to develop the fundamentals of their own legal tech startup. The final for the class will take the form of a pitch competition by each student to a panel of legal tech entrepreneurs and experts.

    Design Thinking & Access to Justice

    Professor Alice Armitage | Fall Semester

    Course description coming soon.

    Startup Legal Garage (coursework component)

    Fall Semester

    The Startup Legal Garage provides startups with legal resources, free of charge. The program provides students with hands-on experience working directly with startups and attorneys serving the startup community.

    Fall or Spring Semester

    Transformative technologies will continue to reshape how we live, work, learn, and play. In this course we will study how the law has evolved around new technologies. In particular, we'll explore the present and future impacts of automated driving systems, 3D printing, transportation network platforms, commercial drones, and blockchain. We will also challenge ourselves to think creatively about how regulatory landscapes should be built.

    Professor Lothar Determann | Spring Semester

    California privacy law is constantly evolving and leading the United States and other countries. In this course, students will be introduced to key aspects of U.S. Federal and California privacy law and explore this interesting field by working through research and writing assignments relating to the instructor's handbook, California Privacy Law - Practical Guide and Commentary, 3d Ed. 2018. Throughout the semester, students will work through reading, research and graded writing assignments.

    Fall or Spring Semester

    The recent expansion of electronic discovery in civil litigation raises a host of practical, technical and ethical issues for both lawyers and clients. The volume of potentially discoverable electronically stored information (ESI) is growing exponentially. Much of that ESI is stored on widely dispersed, unconnected, outdated or downright inaccessible systems. As a number of recent, high profile cases illustrate, the stakes for both lawyers and clients are high. This course covers up-to-date developments in the doctrines governing e-discovery, as well as the practical, technical and ethical issues discussed above.

    Fall or Spring Semester

    This seminar will survey key legal issues in Internet law, including intellectual property ("Who owns your MySpace?"), electronic commerce ("Is a click a contract?"), content regulation ("What if a kid sees that?"), privacy and anonymity ("Who can tell I'm reading Perez Hilton?"), unauthorized access ("When is hacking a crime?"), and Internet governance ("Who's in charge here?"). Readings will focus on the latest developments in each of these areas. No technical background is required; supplementary readings will be available for those without basic knowledge of Internet technology and intellectual property law.

    Professor Chimène Keitner | Spring Semester

    This colloquium offers students the opportunity to hear from and interact with experts in the fields of national security law, cyberlaw, and social media regulation, while providing a forum for students to produce papers based on their individual research interests within these fields. The colloquium will cover topics related to Russian election interference, cross-border regulation of speech and data, and international law in cyberspace.

    Venture Capital & Start-Up

    Professor Rachel Proffitt | Spring Semester

    This course will focus on the role of venture capital in the organization and development of the startup technology company, with emphasis on both the legal and business perspectives of this subject. The course will feature a number of guest speakers to share their experience from a real world perspective, including venture capitalists from Silicon Valley-based venture capital funds, executives from existing venture-backed technology companies, attorneys from local law firms that concentrate in the technology area, and others

    Fall Semester

    The course will focus on the study of the technology and the impact it is having on the law and the delivery of legal services is called "Legal Informatics." After we have acquired an understanding of the traditional methods of delivering legal services and the economic and technological changes impacting the legal industry, we will explore in more depth the legal technologies designed to increase the efficiency, productivity and accessibility of the law.

    Professor Heather Fields | Fall Semester

    This course will introduce students to fundamental business, economic, and finance concepts that lawyers need to know in order to advise their clients effectively in a wide variety of practice areas, including civil litigation, public interest law, family law, estate planning, real estate and environmental law, healthcare law, intellectual property law, business law, and tax law, among others. NOTE: Students with strong business, economics, or finance backgrounds should not enroll, and students who have taken or are enrolled in Corporate Finance may not take this course.

    U.S. Privacy Law

    Fall Semester

    Course description coming soon.

    Spring Semester

    This seminar will examine recent developments in data privacy law in light of ever-increasing data aggregation and cybersurveillance practices by corporations and governments. The seminar will weave in discussion of statutory, common law, and constitutional frameworks are currently being applied in legal challenges to these activities, including federal and state wiretapping laws, biometric collection statutes, the tort of intrusion upon seclusion, and constitutional privacy issues. We will consider current critiques of privacy law as conceptualized by practitioners, as well as suggestions for navigating the future of privacy rights as it relates to our increasingly digitized lives. This seminar is not a survey of privacy law. Instead, it will focus on the conceptual underpinnings of privacy rights in light of current privacy litigation, critiques of pervasive privacy law-related practices, and prescriptive questions of what privacy law should be, both now and in the future.

    Fall or Spring Semester

    Technology which uses personal data to provide novel services raise questions about how to balance privacy against innovation. Artificial intelligence ("AI") plays an increasingly prominent role in how we live, work, and die. It irresistibly multiplies our ability to innovate and produce. But we cede control of our society's future if we fail to create meaningful rules for the technology that rules us. The first half of this course will introduce students to foundational legal and policy issues arising at the intersection of AI and privacy law, including algorithmic bias, profiling, and data subject rights. In the second half of the course, students will explore the privacy and regulatory implications of new AI technologies used by tech companies to detect and prevent (1) harmful content, such as child exploitation imagery and hate speech, and (2) harmful behavior, such as violent crime and suicide. Students will also examine how competing regulatory approaches toward novel uses of AI implicate tradeoffs in privacy, safety, innovation, and other values.

    Fall or Spring Semester

    This course surveys approaches to privacy regulation around the globe, including a comparison of regulatory frameworks and different policy solutions. The course also introduces the major international privacy regulatory and enforcement institutions. Core lecturing will focus on the European General Data Protection Regulation and how it compares with US law. Core concepts include controller/processor, personal data/personal information, data subject/consumer, cross-border transfers and processing which will be approached through lecture from a comparative perspective.

    Fall or Spring Semester

    The course prepares students for an in-house, product and high technology practice, with an emphasis on product development, identifying and understanding supply chain risks, and working effectively to advise and counsel engineers in a technology environment. The objective of this course is to equip students with the tools and skills needed to step successfully into legal positions from start-ups to top technology companies after law school. Students will draft, review and negotiate actual business and technology agreements such as (1) NDAs; (2) Product, Hardware and Manufacturing Supply Agreements; (3) Engineering Services, Design and Development Agreements; (4) Software License Agreements; and (5) Joint Development Agreements. Additionally, students will consider issues that arise during the contract lifecycle, handling business disputes, transactional ethics, dealing with stress & deal fatigue.

    Corporate Counsel Externship Program

    Fall or Spring Semester

    Description coming soon.

    Legal Externship Program

    Fall or Spring Semester

    Course description coming soon

    Compliance & Risk Management

    Fall Semester

    Course description coming soon.

    Compliance: Privacy

    Spring Semester

    Course description coming soon.

    Compliance: Financial Risk

    Spring Semester

    Course description coming soon.

    Emerging Digital Entertainment Law

    Spring Semester

    Course description coming soon.

    Energy Law

    Spring Semester

    Course description coming soon.

    Intellectual Property Survey

    Fall or Spring Semester

    Course description coming soon.

    Stat: Intellectual Property

    Spring Semester

    Course description coming soon.

    Patents and Trade Secrets

    Spring Semester

    Course description coming soon.

    IP Under State Law: Trade Secrets

    Spring Semester

    Course description coming soon.

    Copyright

    Spring Semester

    Course description coming soon.

    Leadership Skills for Lawyers

    Spring Semester

    Course description coming soon.

    Negotiation Practice & Process

    Spring Semester

    Course description coming soon.

    Video Game Law

    Fall or Spring Semester

    Course description coming soon.

  • Certifications Available to Students

    UC Hastings students can supplement their coursework with a privacy certification

    Privacy Pathways Program

    UC Hastings is one of a select few law schools to partner with the IAPP to offer this credentialing program.

    Administered by the International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP), the CIPP certification is the global standard for expertise in privacy laws, regulations and frameworks.

     

    Through the Privacy Pathways program, current UC Hastings students are eligible for a deeply discounted student certification package that includes IAPP membership, training materials, and registration for one certification exam.

     

    Interested students should contact the Director of LexLab, Drew Amerson.

  • Dean David Faigman

    Meet the professors

    The leading minds in tech and innovation have come together to create this one of a kind curriculum and shape the future of legal education to come.

    Alice Armitage

    Director of Applied Innovation, UC Hastings

    Chief Executive Professor, LexLab

    Professor Alice Armitage is the Director of Applied Innovation at UC Hastings, overseeing both LexLab and the Startup Legal Garage. These two innovative programs are unique to UC Hastings and aim to prepare students for practicing law in today's legal space.

    Alison Drutchas

    Adjunct Professor at UC Hastings

    Policy and Product Counsel at Waymo

    Robin Feldman

    Director of the Institute for Innovation Law

     

    Professor Robin Feldman received a bachelor's degree from Stanford University and a J.D. from Stanford Law School, graduating the Order of the Coif and receiving the Urban A. Sontheimer Award for graduating second in the class. Professor Feldman also served in the Articles Department of the Stanford...​

    Morris Ratner

    Academic Dean

    Professor Ratner (BA, Stanford University 1988; JD, Harvard Law School 1991) is the chief academic officer of UC Hastings. Professor Ratner teaches civil procedure, legal ethics, and the business of law practice, and produces scholarship at the intersection of those fields. He joined the UC Hastings...​

    Ugo Mattei

    Distinguished Professor of Law & Hanna Fromm Chair in International and Comparative Law

    Rachel Proffit

    Adjunct Professor, UC Hastings

    Partner, Cooley LLP

     

    Rachel practices corporate and securities law and represents public and private clients, as well as venture capital and investment banking firms and other institutional investors, across a broad range of industries. Her practice focuses on general corporate and complex transactional matters, including venture capital transactions, public and private securities offerings, mergers and acquisitions and other strategic transactions, and public-company disclosure and corporate governance. Prior to joining Cooley, Rachel was a partner at Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati.

    Shane Glynn

    Adjunct Professor, UC Hastings

    General Counsel and Cofounder, MobileCoin

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